Daily Dialogue — April 5, 2017

WILL: So, why do you think I should work for the National Security Agency?
NSA AGENT: Well, you'd be working on the cutting edge. You'd be exposed to the kind of technology that you wouldn't see anywhere else because we've classified it. Super string theory, chaos math, advanced algorithms…
WILL: Code-breaking.
NSA AGENT: Well, that's one aspect of what we do.
WILL: Oh, c'mon, I mean, that is what you do. You guys handle 80 percent of the intelligence workload. You're seven times the size of the CIA.
NSA AGENT: We don't like to brag about that, Will. So, the way I see it, the question isn't Why SHOULD you work for the
NSA? The question is: Why shouldn't you?
WILL: Why shouldn't I work for the N.S.A.? That's a tough one, but I'll take a shot. Say I'm working at N.S.A. Somebody puts a code on my desk, something nobody else can break. Maybe I take a shot at it and maybe I break it. And I'm real happy with myse lf, 'cause I did my job well. But maybe that code was the location of some rebel army in North Africa or the Middle East. Once they have that location, they bomb the village where the rebels were hiding and fifteen hundred people I never met, never had no problem with, get killed. Now the politicians are sayin', "Oh, send in the Marines to secure the area" 'cause they don't give a shit. It won't be their kid over there, gettin' shot. Just like it wasn't them when their number got called, 'cause they were pullin' a tour in the National Guard. It'll be some kid from Southie takin' shrapnel in the ass. And he comes back to find that the plant he used to work at got exported to the country he just got back from. And the guy who put the shrapnel in his ass got his old job, 'cause he'll work for fifteen cents a day and no bathroom breaks. Meanwhile, he realizes the only reason he was over there in the first place was so we could install a government t hat would sell us oil at a good price. And, of course, the oil companies used the skirmish over there to scare up domestic oil prices. A cute little ancillary benefit for them, but it ain't helping my buddy at two-fifty a gallon. And they're takin' their sweet time bringin' the oil back, of course, and maybe even took the liberty of hiring an alcoholic skipper who likes to drink martinis and fuckin' play slalom with the icebergs, and it ain't too long 'til he hits one, spills the oil and kills all the sea life in the North Atlantic. So now my buddy's out of work and he can't afford to drive, so he's got to walk to the fuckin' job interviews, which sucks 'cause the shrapnel in his ass is givin' him chronic hemorrhoids. And meanwhile he's starvin', 'cause every time he tries to get a bite to eat, the only blue plate special they're servin' is North Atlantic scrod with Quaker State. So what did I think? I'm holdin' out for somethin' bet ter. I figure fuck it, while I'm at it why not just shoot my buddy, take his job, give it to his sworn enemy, hike up gas prices, bomb a village, club a baby seal, hit the hash pipe and join the National Guard? I could be elected president.

Good Will Hunting (1997), written by Matt Damon and Ben Affleck

The Daily Dialogue theme for the week: Job Interview. Today's recommendation by Gisela Wehrl.

Trivia: Matt Damon and Ben Affleck found a clever way to choose the right studio for their script: the story goes that on page 60 of the script, they wrote a completely out-of-nowhere sex scene between Will and Chuckie. They took it to every major studio, and nobody even mentioned the scene. When they met with Harvey Weinstein at Miramax, he said, "I only have one really big note on the script. About page 60, the two leads, both straight men, have a sex scene. What the hell is that?" — Damon and Affleck explained that they put that scene specifically in there to show them who actually read the script and who didn't. As Weinstein was the only person who brought it up, Miramax was the studio chosen to produce the film.

Dialogue On Dialogue: Commentary by Gisela: "Will changes the roles asking his wanna-be employer a question which employees are asked. The agent gives him positive paraphrases (super string, chaos math), which Will unveils immediately. Then he refers to chaos theory using the butterfly effect to show, what could happen if he would work for the NSA — he even compares it to murder. The dialogue not only unveils Will's political opinion but also his character: He is fast thinking and sarcastic."


Daily Dialogue — April 5, 2017 was originally published in Go Into The Story on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Go Into The Story – Medium

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